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Returning to School After Illness

 

nhs guide

At Stanburn we follow the  nhsNHS guidance.
For more information on an illness or condition and the latest up-to-date guidance, please visit www.nhs.uk

Condition

Recommended period to be kept away from school (once child is well)

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Chickenpox

Until all spots have crusted and formed a scab - usually five - seven days from onset of rash.

Chicken pox causes a rash of red, itchy spots that turn into fluid filled blisters. They then crust over the form scabs, which eventually drop off. 

Coughs and Colds

Most coughs go away on their own within 3 weeks. There's usually no need to see a GP.

It's fine to send your child to school with a minor cough or cold. But if they have a fever, keep them off school until the fever goes. 

Encourage your child to throw away any used tissues and to wash their hands regularly.

 Cold Sores

None 

 Many healthy children and adults excrete this virus at some time without having a 'sore' (herpes simplex virus).

 Fever

If your child has a fever, keep them off school until the fever goes away. 

 A fever is a high temperature of 38C or more. Fever is the body's natural response to fighting infections like coughs and colds. Many things can cause a high temperature in children. from common childhood illnesses, to vaccinations. 

 German Measles (Rubella)

Five days from onset of rash. 

The child is most infectious before the diagnosis is made and most children should be immune, following the MMR immunsation programme, so exclusion after the rash appears to prevent very few cases. Rubella can be serious during pregnancy.

Hand, foot and mouth disease

None - only need to stay away from school if they are feeling unwell.

Usually a mild disease does not justify time off school. It usually gets better in 7 to 10 days. 

Encourage your child to throw away any used tissues and to wash their hands regularly.

Impetigo

48 hours after treatment starts and/or until lesions are crusted or healed. 

Antibiotic treatment by mouth may speed healing. If lesions can reliably be kept covered exclusion may be shortened. 

Measles

Five days from onset of rash. 

Measles is now rare in the UK. 

Molluscum contagiosum (MC)

 None

Usually a mild condition. 

Ringworm (Tinea)

None

Proper treatment by the GP is important. Scalp ringworm needs treatment with an antifungal by mouth. 

Roseola

None - once the high temperature has passed you do not need to keep your child away from school. There's no need to wait for the rash to disappear.

A mild illness, usually caught from a well person. 

Scabies

You or your child can go back to school or work 24 hours after the first treatment.

Outbreaks have occasionally occurred in schools and nurseries. Child can return as soon as properly treated. This should include all the persons in the household.  

Scarlet Fever

24 hours after taking the first GP prescribed medication 

 In the past, scarlet fever was a serious illness, but antibiotics mean it is now less common and easier to treat. 

Encourage your child to throw away any used tissues and to wash their hands regularly.

Slapped Cheek or Fifth Disease (Parvovirus)

None 

Exclusion is ineffective as nearly all transmission takes place before the child becomes unwell. 

Encourage your child to throw away any used tissues and to wash their hands regularly.

Warts and Verrucas

None 

Affected children may go swimming and take part in PE but verruca should be covered.  

Diarrhoea and/or vomiting (with or without a specific diagnosis)

Until diarrhoea and vomiting has settled - with neither for the previous 48 hours. Please check with the school before sending your child back. 

Usually there will be no specific diagnosis and for most conditions there is no specific treatment. A longer period of exclusion may be appropriate for children unable to maintain good personal hygiene.  

 E-coli and Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome

Depends on the type of E-coli. Seek further advice.

 

 Giardiasis

Until diarrhoea has settled for the previous 48 hours. 

 There is a specific antiobiotic treatment. 

 Salmonella

Until diarrhoea and vomiting has settled - with neither for the previous 48 hours. Seek further advice. 

A longer period of exclusion may be appropriate for children unable to maintain good personal hygiene.

Shigella

Until diarrhoea and vomiting has settled - with neither for the previous 48 hours. Seek further advice.

A longer period of exclusion may be appropriate for children unable to maintain good personal hygiene.

Flu

None

Flu is most infectious just before and at the onset of symptoms. 

Encourage your child to throw away any used tissues and to wash their hands regularly.

Tuberculosis

Seek further advice.

Generally requires quite prolonged, close contact for spread. Not usually spread from children. 

Whooping cough (Pertussis)

Five days from commencing antibiotic treatment. Seek further advice. 

Treatment is recommended although non infectious coughing may still continue for many weeks. 

Conjunctivitis

None

No need to avoid school unless your child is feeling very unwell. 

Encourage your child to throw away any used tissues and to wash their hands regularly, and discourage them from rubbing their eyes. 

Glandular fever

None

Child can return to school as soon as they start to feel better. 

Head Lice (nits)

None. Treat head lice as soon as they are seen - there's no need to keep your child off school if they have head lice.

Treatment  is recommended where live lice have definitely been seen. Everyone in the household should be checked. 

Mumps

Five days from onset of swollen glands. 

The child is most infectious before the diagnosis is made and most children should be immune due to immunisation. 

Threadworm

None

Transmission is uncommon in schools but treatment is recommended for all persons in the household. 

Tonsilitis

None

There are many causes, but most cases are due to viruses and therefore do not need an antibiotic. One cause, streptococcal infection, is treated with antibiotics. 

Clicking on the link for each illness/condition directs to the NHS website with further guidance on symptoms, and guidance. 

More information can be found at:

https://healthmatters.clch.nhs.uk/ and https://www.nhs.uk/